BizNis Africa
Latest News
What is the value of investing in Nigeria?
Active managers in Africa and frontier markets have to...
Facebook Africa gears up for Creative Week at #Loeries2017
Facebook is once again throwing its full support behind...
Angonix ranked top 3 Internet Exchange Point in Africa
Angonix, an Internet Exchange Point (IXP) based in Luanda,...
Foreign investment in Africa’s hospitality sector rises
The hospitality sector in Africa’s emerging markets looks set...
Emira Property Fund reports total dividend of 143.18 cents per share
Emira Property Fund today, 16 August 2017, reported a...
Lagos to experience 16% fewer airline seats on domestic routes
An analysis of seat capacity for travel to the...
New Angolan beverage plant approved for development
A company formed by Sun Ocean Holdings Ltd., a...
MTN Foundation donates ZAR250 000 to Tshwaranang Legal Advocacy Centre
MTN SA Foundation has donated ZAR250 000 to Tshwaranang Legal...
Infrastructure Africa encourages unity through regional projects
Intra-African trade sits at around 11% and if Africa...
Black asset managers control ZAR416 billion of SA investments
Black asset managers have grown to 45 in number,...

Albert Mugo, KenGen CEO

As a follow up to the news published recently on Africa making positive strides in the energy sector, we observe that Kenya’s main electricity producer KenGen, is also doing its part to see through its expansion plans. The power generator is reported to be in the process of looking for an adviser to help it secure financing for the development of a 140MW geothermal plant.

“We hope to have picked the transaction adviser by the end of July after which the firm will start preparing the tender documents including how we will evaluate potential investors,” said Albert Mugo, KenGen Chief Executive Officer.

KenGen the 70% government owned company has installed capacity of 1,252 megawatts out of Kenya’s total 1,767MW. It aims to add another 844MW to the grid by 2017 as part of a broader national power expansion program in which the government targets installed capacity of 5,000MW by then, in a bid to boost growth.

Given that about 46% of Kenya’s capacity is from hydropower generation, solely from KenGen, this has made the country prone to high energy costs in times of droughts.

Low hydrology levels, as is the current situation, have prompted increased usage of diesel-fired thermal power capacity of which the fuel cost is passed on to the consumer, increasing their burden.

As such, much of the new power supply will come from geothermal sources, tapping underground steam from the Rift Valley.

Comments are closed.

Ver peliculas online
%d bloggers like this: