General Electric unveils future of work report in Nigeria

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General Electric Nigeria, today, 12 December 2017, released a whitepaper titled “The Future of Work in Nigeria – Bridging the Skills Gap: The Key to Unlocking Nigeria’s Inherent Potential” as part of the company’s global ‘The Future of Work’ series to highlight the need for investment in sustainable skills development.

In this 2017 issue, GE commissioned a survey of four key industries – Oil and Gas, Transportation, Healthcare and Power – for insight from their key leaders, including CEOs, HR and operations directors, on the impact of skills shortage on their businesses, as well as the ways to address skills shortages.

“Competing in the 21st century global economy requires advanced skills development strategies and policies robust enough to adjust to changes in the economic landscape and the associated demands for skills. GE is committed to building a world that works better. We are committed to building skills to meet critical needs and fill skills gaps domestically and globally. Our aim is to achieve success by building collaboration, increasing employability, and engaging the public sector and business community. We understand that there is no one-size-fits-all approach to skills development. Indeed, it varies across countries and sectors. However, what is constant is the need for both the public and private sector to come together to ensure that the education system- from traditional structures, to vocational and new approaches are producing the necessary skills for the country’s current needs while anticipating its skills needs in the future,” adds Lazarus Angbazo, GE Africa President and Chief Executive Officer.

The report highlighted quality education as crucial to Nigeria’s future socio-economic development and emphasized the strain as a misalignment between current curriculum and industry needs places on the country’s infrastructural development, while recommending dialogue as a first step and public-private partnerships as a key driver in enhancing the quality of education.

“Nigeria faces a Herculean task in plugging its skills gap. As the economy grows and new technologies emerge, the demand for skilled, competent and technical employees will only grow. Much of the emphasis needs to be placed on educational resourcing and policy reform – issues that sit predominantly with government and donors. But, the private sector has both a vested interest and a role to play in supporting the development of talent and the widening of the skills base in Nigeria,” concludes Professor Yemi Osinbajo, Nigeria Vice President.

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Bontle Moeng is the Founder and Managing Director of BizNis Africa. Moeng has spent 15 years working in the digital and online media industry across Africa. She applied her trade at True Love magazine prior to discovering her passion for Investment news in key sectors across Africa. Moeng previously worked for ITWeb, Starfish Mobile Technologies, ITNewsAfrica, AVATAR Agency, eNitiate, Global Interface Consulting and Havas Johannesburg. Her primary focus is to provide solid and valuable content on investment opportunities for the ICT, Energy and Mining sectors across Africa. In addition, the online news publication assists global companies to expand their presence in Africa. Email: news@biznisafrica.co.za

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